Infection Prevention in Healthcare Settings

Provides learners with a foundational understanding of infection prevention techniques.

Interested? Demo Course
Scroll Down Arrow


About this Course

This course provides learners with an understanding of pathogen transmission in healthcare settings, current scientifically accepted infection prevention principles, and prevention strategies that minimize pathogen transmission among patients and healthcare personnel. It covers the major types of healthcare-associated infections, other pathogens of concern, and communicable diseases.

Course Preview:

Language Availability: English

Suggested Audiences: Clinical Investigators, Faculty, Healthcare Personnel, Nurses, Physicians, Researchers, Residents, Staff, Students, Technicians

Organizational Subscription Price: $675 per year/per site for government and non-profit organizations; $750 per year/per site for for-profit organizations
Independent Learner Price: $99 per person

Demo Instructions


Course Content

Introduction

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) may result when a patient receives care in a healthcare facility. Infection prevention programs monitor for HAIs through surveillance and implement measures to prevent HAIs that affect patients and healthcare personnel alike. Many HAIs are preventable when healthcare personnel follow appropriate precautions and practices. In this module, learners will explore the impact of these infections on patients and healthcare systems, the importance of surveillance and the reporting process, and the core measures to prevent HAIs.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20652 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs)

HAIs are important causes of morbidity and mortality that occur as a result of care that patients receive in healthcare settings. Every year, millions of these infections occur in the U.S. but they are largely preventable when healthcare personnel follow best practices. This module provides an overview of the major types of HAIs in healthcare facilities, including their impact on patients and prevention mechanisms and processes. It also discusses the prevention of other pathogens of concern.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20653 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile)

With the emergence of widespread antibiotic use, Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) has become one of the most burdensome healthcare-associated infections since its discovery as a pathogenic cause of pseudomembranous colitis. This module reviews the relevant epidemiology and risk factors for C. difficile infection and key prevention measures to mitigate infection at both the patient and healthcare system levels.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20654 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSIs)

CLABSIs are important healthcare-associated infections that hospitals report to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All healthcare personnel who care for patients with central lines, also known as central venous access devices (CVADs) or central venous catheters, play important roles in reducing CLABSI risks. This module discusses core CLABSI preventive measures that all healthcare personnel should be familiar with prior to caring for patients with central venous catheters. The module also reviews the key clinical manifestations and management of CLABSIs.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20655 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs)

The use of indwelling urinary catheters is common in healthcare settings, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, and ambulatory clinics. Patients with these types of catheters are at risk for developing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). All healthcare personnel play a key role in eliminating CAUTIs. This module will help personnel fulfill that role by reviewing the different types of urinary catheters and their indications for use, how infection occurs in patients with indwelling urinary catheters, and the optimal infection prevention practices for reducing CAUTIs.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20656 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Surgical Site Infections (SSIs)

SSIs are common healthcare-associated infections that can lead to substantial patient morbidity and mortality. All clinicians can help reduce SSI rates by using fundamental infection prevention measures. This module reviews the epidemiology and impact of SSIs along with the modifiable risks for these types of infections. It concludes with strategies that clinicians may use to decrease SSI risk.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20657 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Tuberculosis

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (tuberculosis) is a leading cause of death worldwide and remains a central public health concern. Tuberculosis is readily transmissible through airborne spread, and consequently, special considerations are necessary for patients with suspected tuberculosis to help prevent the spread of the disease to healthcare personnel and other patients. In this module, learners will review the mechanism of tuberculosis transmission and identify settings where the risk of tuberculosis transmission increases. The module concludes with a discussion of the infection control measures necessary to prevent tuberculosis transmission in healthcare settings.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20658 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Vaccination of Healthcare Personnel (HCP)

Healthcare facilities maintain appropriate and up-to-date immunization to protect HCP and the patients who are receiving care. Healthcare facility immunization programs are crucial mechanisms to help ensure workplace safety. This module identifies the benefits of vaccinating HCP, the general principles for HCP vaccination in healthcare facilities, and the major vaccinations that all HCP should receive when working in healthcare facilities.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20659 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Healthcare Personnel (HCP) Exposed to Communicable Diseases

HCP are at risk for infection from communicable and bloodborne diseases by the nature of working in patient care. In healthcare settings, the nosocomial transmission of bloodborne pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), can occur through needlestick injuries and blood and body fluid exposures to non-intact skin or mucous membranes. While a robust occupational health program and adherence to healthcare facility safety protocols can mitigate the risk of transmission events, all HCP play a role in maintaining a safe environment. In this module, learners will review the best tools for preventing exposures in healthcare settings as well as critical mechanisms for managing an exposure event. The module concludes with a review of the major types of bloodborne pathogens HCP may be exposed to in the workplace.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20660 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Hand and Environmental Hygiene

In the healthcare environment, pathogenic organisms that persist on surfaces, medical devices, and the hands of healthcare personnel can spread among patients and healthcare personnel. The implementation of hand and environmental hygiene practices can prevent this risk and ensure patient safety. This module describes the importance of and techniques for optimal hand hygiene, the major methods of disinfecting surfaces and devices, and hygiene practices that prevent infection in the healthcare environment.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20661 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

Working in healthcare facilities places healthcare personnel at risk of exposure to infectious agents. Therefore, healthcare personnel should wear appropriate PPE to protect themselves and prevent the transmission of pathogens. This module discusses the fundamentals of Standard and Transmission-Based Precautions in healthcare settings, the differences in pathogen transmission, and the types of PPE. Healthcare personnel who follow the Standard and Transmission-Based Precautions, including the appropriate use of PPE, can significantly mitigate the risk of transmitting infectious agents.

Recommended Use: Required
ID (Language): 20662 (English)
Author(s): Scott C. Roberts, MD, MS - Yale School of Medicine; Richard A. Martinello, MD - Yale School of Medicine


FAQs

Who should take the Infection Prevention in Healthcare Settings course?

The suggested audience includes incoming residents in any field of medicine as well as other healthcare personnel with duties requiring knowledge of infection prevention. “Healthcare personnel” is a general term for all healthcare workers, including physicians, nurses, emergency medical personnel, dental professionals and students, medical and nursing students, laboratory technicians, pharmacists, hospital volunteers, and administrative staff.

How long does it take to complete the Infection Prevention in Healthcare Settings course?

This course consists of 11 required modules. The modules contain detailed content and images, knowledge checks, and case studies, and each module includes a quiz.

Modules vary in length, and learners may require different amounts of time to complete them based on their familiarity and knowledge of the topic. However, the entire course should take about 4 hours to complete.

What are the standard recommendations for learner groups?

This course is designed such that learners should complete all 11 required modules.

Is this course eligible for continuing medical education credits?

This course does not currently have CE/CME credits available.

Why should an organization subscribe to this course?

Organizational subscriptions provide access to the organization's affiliated members. This allows organizations to meet the infection prevention training needs of individuals who work in healthcare settings.